Bad News: WhatsApp, Facebook Data-Sharing Deal could be done by Summer

WhatsApp, Facebook

Hello WhatsAppers! There is bad news out there for you, more so, if you so much value your privacy. Apparently, WhatsApp and its parent, Facebook, quest to share data is almost done, says EU lawmakers.

Last year, Facebook announced its desire to glean WhatsApp users’ data for business purposes causing incoherent grumbles among WhatsApp diehards, which led to intervention by European Union Data Protection authorities who asked the two companies to temporarily halt the deal.

That was last year. This year, in the past few days to be precise, there has been fresh news emerging from EU lawmakers that the deal might soon be real and WhatsApp will be free to share data with the social media powerhouse.

Facebook has been in negotiations with the authorities for some time now and by the looks of things they are closing in on an agreement.

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Recall

Facebook bought WhatsApp in 2014 for an eye-popping $19 billion, which the now most popular cross-platform messaging app has proved to be worth every cent. Then, WhatsApp and Facebook assured users that their privacy – one of the fundamentals behind the platform’s incredible upsurge to fame – will remain unchanged whatsoever.

Out-and-out WhatsApp users felt shortchanged by Facebook’s change of position on what (WhatsApp’s privacy policy) they swore to protect. In fact, during the changeover, Facebook’s co-founder and CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, gave his word saying that it would be stupid of him and his company to interfere with the then startup messenger users’ privacy.

Although WhatsApp sought for its users’ consent to the plan, that process was marred with controversies prompting the 28 EU data protection agencies to call on Facebook and WhatsApp to suspend the program.

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WhatsApp, Facebook

All said and done, it is now clear that Facebook could start collecting data from WhatsApp come this summer. Helen Dixon, who is Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner, said that the major bone of contention between EU data protection authorities and the two social media giants has been around the manner in which the duo approached the move. She says that both parties have now acknowledged that users should have been provided with clearer and more transparent information, expressed in simpler terms.

With such a milestone already hit, the parties should reach a solution sooner than later.

In other news, Facebook’s creativity has also been called into question following a recent launch of Snapchat-like feature known as Facebook Stories which basically allows users to upload clips – both video and picture – which expire within a day.

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What do you think about this change to WhatsApp privacy policy by the owners, Facebook? Let us know in your comments below.

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